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  1. #21

    Sweaty Dick Punching Enthusiast

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    A soggy living room floor is the stuff of homeowner nightmares.

    Here's to hoping the repairs go well Tyche.

  2. #22
    I like to eat food
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    That is all rot.

  3. #23
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    So about your home inspector . . . .

  4. #24
    The Optimistic Asshole
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    I've has the house for 12 yrs

  5. #25
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    Water = the devil.

  6. #26
    Ironing this Thread
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    Did some work this year, little bit of landscaping got rid of some bushes and dune grass added some block. Had some cheap labor put new sheetrock on ceilings and spackle and paint it. When they were almost done they offered to do paint the walls too for cheap, said yes.

    They ended up doing a terrible job but it was all done in one week and my wife and I didn't have to do it, it's not really noticable and we're looking to sell in a year or two anyway so nbd.

    We decided the next projects we'd do ourselves or call a pro. I decided I wanted to change every door to a 6 panel door. Did one and it took all day, said fuck it and called my future brother in law's buddy who's really fucking good. They did 8 interiors doors, a fire door and a new storm door. House looks great best decision we've made. Decided we would do all the door and trim painting we got time.

    Turns out we don't got time. I did 3 doors and their trim and my wife is 35 weeks preggo and isn't able to keep up and I just don't have the time while I'm stressing over my new job. We really need the baby room and office done so I called my guy hoping to hear an estimate this weekend. Broke it up into a few different projects; nursery and office doors and trim, rest of the doors I didn't get to, and paint our two bathrooms just because. Hope it's not too bad.

  7. #27
    Relic Horn
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    Lot of great info here. I'm not a home owner, but I've been in the HVAC field with a company that also does plumbing and electrical. Some other things (one electrical note, most others about HVAC) to keep in mind if you're looking at buying:

    Knob and tube wiring isn't common anymore, but it's not uncommon to find it in use in homes from pre 1950s~. It's not exactly dangerous on it's own. The problems come from it being so old that the insulating materials have deteriorated and you likely have exposed wires. Combine this with the lack of a ground and it's sagging due to age and you're likely to find yourself with a fire hazard with insulation around it. For this reason, home insurance can be pricey or even not an option if the home has it. I believe some areas still allow it to exist, as in it's not required to be replaced, but I believe it hasn't been an option for new installs for something like 50 years.

    HVAC system: Insure it's not only functional (duh - but we get a lot of calls from new home buyers who didn't get the out of season system checked), but insure it's what you want. To elaborate, each type of heating equipment has a different functionality, cost, and experience beyond "keep me warm."

    Gas forced air heat is common in most residential areas. Rural areas may have a propane tank if gas isn't available. Forced air gas heat has a certain degree of "umph" to it that many people prefer. There's something about being able to feel the heat blow if you're cold that people always miss when going for another option. This is typically a good middle of the road option that isn't too pricey to install, maintain, or use.

    Electric heat (baseboard heaters, emergency heat air handlers) are typically cheaper, though your energy costs will be through the roof and you'll have more of a static feeling within your home.

    Heat pumps (with an air handler as a backup - some use a gas furnace as a backup to get the best of both worlds) are a very energy efficient system, however they struggle if the temp drops below freezing. I would not consider a heat pump if I lived anywhere that expected below freezing temps as your air handler (IE, electric heat) will kick on to supplement the system, jacking your energy bills. Heat pumps also lack that "umph" that many prefer with forced air gas systems.

    Boilers (steam, oil, gas, electric) are typically another energy efficient system, but unlike forced air systems, you're reliant on the radiating elements in each room. This is another common point of failure and is typically not cheap to repair nor maintain. Since you're now reliant on not only the boiler itself but also the entirety of the radiator layout throughout the home, install and maintenance prices are high. Some (IMO, mostly the older generation) prefer the gentle feeling of radiant heat.

    Any oil system should be harshly considered before moving forward. Oil systems are pricey to both maintain and repair, and your fuel source is largely reliant on a single supplier in a given area. Finding a technician to perform repairs and maintenance is also becoming increasingly hard (at least in my area). I think I recall Toki having a horror story about his in-ground oil tank having a breach which resulted in thousands upon thousands in repairs. In some homes, the tank is actually kept in the basement as well which can lead to even worse problems. My company no longer works on oil systems, but 4~ years ago, we had an issue with a system having a "puff back" where it discharged oil and soot into the airspace of the home. Many aspects of the home were ruined and needed replaced entirely, ranging from the duct work, drywall, stucco ceilings, some appliances, etc. All in total, I believe it was about $25k that we paid out to make things right, and even then, I don't think you could get it all out of the home.

    Lots of talk of DIY vs getting a professional. Something to add to that, I'd insure to always get multiple professional's estimate. Many have different business models that can effect the work done. Much like Jaybar mentioned budget, quality, and time for renovation or building, you'll have to make these calls on individual jobs and work loads for anything. Is it worth having a warranty on the repair for your HVAC system? Is it worth having a licensed plumber do the new drain you're running outside your home? Is it worth paying a higher price for this mundane repair if they'll stand behind it? They're all questions that you'll need to insure you ask before pulling a trigger. If you do decide to use a company, some will have these aspects built into their services, and thus, their price. Others won't, but if you try and follow up because their repair failed, good luck getting them to budge. Just like anything, insure to scope out what is being done and understand what is being provided (warranty, flat rate vs variable/hourly rate, follow up, maintenance, etc) before you jump in. Buyer's remorse is all too common if you rush.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roranora View Post
    I tried with a friend and we couldn't clear the issue ourselves with a drain snake, so there goes the frugal option. And now the estimate is $400. Bitch, why is a drain cleaning any more than $100?
    $400 is extremely high for a snake. I've never seen over $250 and that was for a main line leading into the yard. Are you sure you weren't quoted a mini jet? Mini jets can oftentimes be quoted for sinks or tubs. Main line jets are a thing as well, but I'd be surprised if that was less than $1000. Snakes are great for physical blockages, but if the blockage could be due to grease, oils, chemicals, etc, they may prefer to insure they get whatever it is out with a jet rather than risk breaking off a snake in your line on something that can't be pushed through.

  8. #28
    Electric Six groupie
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    Don't forget root growth into pipes. Gotta use chemical killers for those since a snake won't be able to do much at all.

  9. #29

    Sweaty Dick Punching Enthusiast

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malithar View Post
    $400 is extremely high for a snake. I've never seen over $250 and that was for a main line leading into the yard. Are you sure you weren't quoted a mini jet? Mini jets can oftentimes be quoted for sinks or tubs. Main line jets are a thing as well, but I'd be surprised if that was less than $1000. Snakes are great for physical blockages, but if the blockage could be due to grease, oils, chemicals, etc, they may prefer to insure they get whatever it is out with a jet rather than risk breaking off a snake in your line on something that can't be pushed through.
    It was grease from the previous owners, so that'd make sense for the jet clean rather than snake. You're exactly right.

  10. #30
    Special at 11:30 or w/e
    Sweaty Dick Punching Enthusiast

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybar View Post
    Don't forget root growth into pipes. Gotta use chemical killers for those since a snake won't be able to do much at all.
    About 13 years ago my sis and I bought a house to flip. Started having a lot of water backup in the basement due to roots in the pipes. Ten years later my wife and I know who we sold the house to and she's continuously had the same issues. Absolute bitch to deal with.

  11. #31
    Relic Horn
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    Roots are just the absolute worst. All the tech and QoL we have, and your home can be crippled thanks to a random tree a hundred feet from your house. Bonus points if the tree isn't on your property and your neighbors won't remove it. Worst part is until the trees are gone, any fix (relaying the pipe, trenchless relining the pipe - illegal in some cities IIRC, check before pulling the trigger, some places have scams) will simply be a bandaid that'll last 10-15~ years before the roots re-breach the line.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roranora View Post
    It was grease from the previous owners, so that'd make sense for the jet clean rather than snake. You're exactly right.
    Thats about the going rate for my area. I'd ask if that includes a camera of the line to insure it's clear. Cameras are a bit of a loaded gun. They'll let you know if the issue has been handled, but it may find minute issues that aren't a big deal that the plumber could try and talk you into repairing. YMMV.

  12. #32
    The Shitlord
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    we've had issues with roots growing into our sewer main, so it'll periodically clog and flood our garage with poo water. but it hasn't happened in a while, so we think it was this ash tree that died. my mom thinks it may have been emerald ash borers, but i think my poo was just so incredibly strong that i killed the tree.

  13. #33
    Shimmy shimmy ya shimmy yam shimmy ya
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadritan View Post
    For any DIY or those of you that want unbiased opinions and information about repairs/remodels I was a carpenter for 10 years.

    Now when I say carpenter, that means everything but electrical and plumbing, though I have some experience in those.

    Decks, tile, interior trim, painting, exterior trim and siding(including Hardi plank), custom fabrication (cabinets etc), full remodels etc. You name it, I've probably done it. The last bathroom remodel I did before changing industries was $480k. So I've done everything from tiny decks to multimillion dollar homes.

    I can be a point of reference. For DIY fair warning, I'm going to be very blunt about what's out of your ability in an effort to save you time, money, and most importantly keep you safe. I've witnessed too many nightmares, both from a cost standpoint and a "he lost a fucking arm," standpoint.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    How realistic would it be to redo hardwood floors myself with zero experience?

  14. #34
    Cardiac Cat
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    Tbh it depends on how good you want it to look and last. You'll also end up using an excessive amount of materials from mistakes. There's a lot of subtle tricks to being efficient and accurate. You'll also have to invest in some decent tools, but could probably get away with about $500 worth or could rent/loan them for less. You don't necessarily need brand new/best, but certain things I wouldn't skimp on. i.e. Makita has the most accurate skill saws but if you drop them even once they're practically useless, whereas a Rigid is very accurate and you can beat it all to shit without having problems. Point is, research tools heavily of you're gonna buy any.

    If you do decide to do it, get serious about research. Don't just find a YouTube video and follow it to the letter. Find about a dozen different sources so you can see some of the situational scenarios and how to correct them. Keep in mind it's probably going to take you a significant amount of time to do it too. Not something you could just knock out on a weekend. You need to allow yourself enough time to take it slow and get things done right the first time. I cannot stress that enough. It pays BIG TIME in the long run. So you have to either clear your schedule or be okay with the job being broken up over time, leaving part of the house useless.

    Now when it comes to hardwood, if you decide to contract it out, get some references. That shit is super easy to fuck up and it can sometimes take a few years to show. I've had to fix some serious bullshit. A lot of hack jobs like to do it because they can do a half is job in a very short amount of time and be long gone before the floor starts to have issues.

    Tl;dr So can you DIY? Absolutely. It'll save a poop load in labor. But make sure you have a ton of time to invest in it or you'll be cussing yourself out in a couple of years.

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  15. #35
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    I'm just gonna do those new porcelin floors or something fuck doing hardwood if it's not already there.

  16. #36
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    I'm very happy that a very good friend of mine owns a flooring business. He's already offered his guys to do our side room. We just finished painting the trim in there yesterday, whole thing is primed, and my wife has patched a few large swatches to see what color she wants the walls.

    We want to put in a half wall next to our side door and create a small, tiled mud room space. I've never added any framing to a space before. How difficult would that be? I figure my brother could probably do it, as he's a trained carpenter, but wanted to know what we're getting into before we paint the walls in there.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tokitoki View Post
    I'm very happy that a very good friend of mine owns a flooring business. He's already offered his guys to do our side room. We just finished painting the trim in there yesterday, whole thing is primed, and my wife has patched a few large swatches to see what color she wants the walls.

    We want to put in a half wall next to our side door and create a small, tiled mud room space. I've never added any framing to a space before. How difficult would that be? I figure my brother could probably do it, as he's a trained carpenter, but wanted to know what we're getting into before we paint the walls in there.
    It depends what the structure is you'll be placing the wall. Is it a basement with concrete slab? Is it over a wood framed floor system? Is it metal decking with concrete and/or gypsum topping (if you are in a highrise, this is likely, else not likely at all). The frame of the half wall would require a horizontal sill plate, vertical studs, and a horizontal top plate (see image)



    You'll need to secure the sill plate to the flooring, so if you're going into a concrete foundation slab then you're not going to have a good time. You'll either need a nail gun and nails rated for concrete (they sound like shotguns) or use expansion bolts. I think there's other options but I don't know how well they work. You will also need to fasten the end of the wall to the existing perpendicular wall - so if you land on a stud that's great, otherwise you'll need to remove some drywall to install additional blocking every ~16" vertically in order to have something to fasten to.

    Fastening into a wood framed floor is much easier. A simple nail gun would suffice as long as you can attach to the floor joists. If the joists run parallel to the wall and you aren't going to a hit a joist, you may need to rip up the subfloor and attach perpendicular blocking every 16" or so to have something to nail into - kinda like the image below but at the floor level not ceiling level.



    The biggest obstacle is going to be access to tools and whether you need to open up the floor to add additional blocking.

  18. #38
    Cardiac Cat
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    Concrete floor requires a Ramset or Hilti. It's a literal nail "gun" as it's powder-actuated.

    Pretty fun and dangerous. Had a guy try to use one on a second floor that didn't have concrete and he came within 6 inches of killing someone.

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  19. #39
    Cardiac Cat
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    Also, expansion bolts are a pain in the dick. Ramset is bang bang bang done. Definitely my preference.

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  20. #40
    Electric Six groupie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadritan View Post
    Also, expansion bolts are a pain in the dick. Ramset is bang bang bang done. Definitely my preference.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Ya we used one on a basement rehab. We had to have someone outside to calm anyone walking by that it wasn't gunshots they heard.

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