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  1. #1
    Sea Torques
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    First HD-DVD rip posted

    The rip was posted on hdbits.org, anyone here on there to dish out some invites?

    Code:
    The pirates of the world have fired another salvo in their ongoing war with copy protection schemes with the first release of the first full-resolution rip of an HD DVD movie on BitTorrent. The movie, Serenity, was made available as a .EVO file and is playable on most DVD playback software packages such as PowerDVD. The file was encoded in MPEG-4 VC-1 and the resulting file size was a hefty 19.6 GB.
    
    This release follows the announcement, less than a month ago, that the copy protection on HD DVD had been bypassed by an anonymous programmer known only as Muslix64. The open-source program to implement this was called BackupHDDVD and was released in a manner designed to put the onus of cracking on the user, not the software. To extract an unencrypted copy of the HD DVD source material required obtaining that disc's volume or title key separately, which the software did not do. However, a key was later released on the Internet, and a method for extracting further keys is allegedly available as well.
    
    Now that the genie is out of the lamp, so to speak, what will the reaction be from the content industry? CyberLink, the makers of PowerDVD playback software, have already stated that the title keys were not obtained through their software, although this has yet to be conclusively proven. As for the content providers themselves, they have already said that they reserve the right to invalidate known pirated keys in the future. But to be of any use, they'll first need to determine which software application is responsible for giving up the volume keys. If it is something like PowerDVD, future titles can require that the user upgrade their software in order to play discs—this can be made to happen automatically when new discs are first inserted.
    
    Muslix64 and others involved in BackupHDDVD are deliberately not exposing the actual method by which the keys have been obtained. This is partly to protect themselves from legal repercussions, but also to ensure that whatever "hole" that is being exploited remains unpatched. In the ongoing war between the pirates and the content providers, the pirates appear to be winning, but who knows who will get caught in the crossfire?

  2. #2
    Sea Torques
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    19.6gigs rofl screw that

  3. #3
    E. Body
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    I thought that it was already legal precedence that copying legally purchased media for the purpose of transfering to a different media type and/or backup was 100% legal for consumers. How can they get away with adding copy protection when it's a consumer right to transfer/backup?

  4. #4
    Ridill
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    People still put 64 in their names? lol.

    And wow, is anyone actually surprised that this was done? >.> I'm not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fhqwghads
    I thought that it was already legal precedence that copying legally purchased media for the purpose of transfering to a different media type and/or backup was 100% legal for consumers. How can they get away with adding copy protection when it's a consumer right to transfer/backup?
    Because this is what they do with it, lol.

  5. #5
    Corwens a slot
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exoduso
    People still put 64 in their names? lol.

    And wow, is anyone actually surprised that this was done? >.> I'm not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fhqwghads
    I thought that it was already legal precedence that copying legally purchased media for the purpose of transfering to a different media type and/or backup was 100% legal for consumers. How can they get away with adding copy protection when it's a consumer right to transfer/backup?
    Because this is what they do with it, lol.
    And people rob people with guns, your point?

  6. #6
    Sea Torques
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    It has to do with the specific wording of the DMCA, at least as long as you're referring to the USA. Essentially, backups are still legal - as long as you don't have to circumvent the encryption on the disc to do it, because if you do that then you're breaking the law. Unfortunately, the way DVDs are encrypted you *have* to circumvent the encryption to backup the disc. This holds true for both original DVDs and the newer HD/blu-ray DVDs.

    See, backing up VHS tapes is still 100% legal because there is no encryption to worry about circumventing.

    Believe you me, Hollywood pulled a rabbit out of the hat when they helped get the DMCA passed. Now, they can effectively charge you the consumer for the same movie multiple times over a series of years. Let's say you were an early DVD adopter and bought the movie "Get Shorty" in 1997. Then, you bought a PSP in 2005 and wanted to watch the movie on that - but, to do it legally you had to re-buy the movie on UMD format - as there is no legal way to rip a DVD -> PSP movie file. Now, in the summer of 2006 you've gone out and bought yourself a nice hybrid HD/Blu-ray DVD player that can handle both formats. Again, you go out and re-purchase the same movie you already own...except now its shinier, or something.

    You've now dropped close to $100, all for one movie. Oh, and maybe originally you liked the movie because you saw it in a theater...so add on another $8

  7. #7
    Ridill
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minions
    Quote Originally Posted by Exoduso
    People still put 64 in their names? lol.

    And wow, is anyone actually surprised that this was done? >.> I'm not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fhqwghads
    I thought that it was already legal precedence that copying legally purchased media for the purpose of transfering to a different media type and/or backup was 100% legal for consumers. How can they get away with adding copy protection when it's a consumer right to transfer/backup?
    Because this is what they do with it, lol.
    And people rob people with guns, your point?
    It's legal to make copies for yourself if you own the original, in case the original gets messed up. It's not legal for you to decrypt the code and put it up on the internet.

    As for the DVD>UMD comment, there's no LEGAL way to put a movie on your psp, but there are about a million ways to make it work.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by draxyl
    It has to do with the specific wording of the DMCA, at least as long as you're referring to the USA. Essentially, backups are still legal - as long as you don't have to circumvent the encryption on the disc to do it, because if you do that then you're breaking the law. Unfortunately, the way DVDs are encrypted you *have* to circumvent the encryption to backup the disc. This holds true for both original DVDs and the newer HD/blu-ray DVDs.

    See, backing up VHS tapes is still 100% legal because there is no encryption to worry about circumventing.

    Believe you me, Hollywood pulled a rabbit out of the hat when they helped get the DMCA passed. Now, they can effectively charge you the consumer for the same movie multiple times over a series of years. Let's say you were an early DVD adopter and bought the movie "Get Shorty" in 1997. Then, you bought a PSP in 2005 and wanted to watch the movie on that - but, to do it legally you had to re-buy the movie on UMD format - as there is no legal way to rip a DVD -> PSP movie file. Now, in the summer of 2006 you've gone out and bought yourself a nice hybrid HD/Blu-ray DVD player that can handle both formats. Again, you go out and re-purchase the same movie you already own...except now its shinier, or something.

    You've now dropped close to $100, all for one movie. Oh, and maybe originally you liked the movie because you saw it in a theater...so add on another $8
    What a bunch of fucking bullshit.

    /rant
    /flipoutmode

    Why the hell do laws like this ever get passed? Fucking big business just screws everyone over... laws and politicians and shady back alley handjob deals. Maybe it's too early. Maybe it's the lack of sleep. But this is the straw breaking the camels back. I hope this planet gets hit by a huge motherfucking asteroid, because jackasses like the ones who came up with this kind of crap, and President Bush, and every other dickweed out there only look out for their own interests and screw over the little people. Die a fiery death in a massive supernova you fucking scumbag pieces of runny chunky shit. DN#DIOn3ier#@)(R#J!#jr3

    /endflipoutmode
    /endrant

    So, how about that weather?

  9. #9
    Ridill
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    lol, it would be nice to watch... except for the part where we'll be dying, too.

  10. #10
    Sea Torques
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    Don't get me wrong, I love a good rant If you have to blame a president for passing this law and not using veto power, the blame lies with Clinton.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DMCA

    Don't blame me, I voted for Kodos.

    Oh, and I should make what I said above a little bit more explicit. If you wanted to create an analog backup of a digital file (DVD, itunes song, whatever) it's still legal to do that. You just can't make a digital to digital backup for most formats these days, because they employ DRM encryption and circumventing it brings in the DMCA.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fhqwghads
    I thought that it was already legal precedence that copying legally purchased media for the purpose of transfering to a different media type and/or backup was 100% legal for consumers. How can they get away with adding copy protection when it's a consumer right to transfer/backup?
    This is the part that REALLY pisses me off. I want to make copies of my son's cartoon DVDs like Acceleracers, Spongebob, Teen Titans (you know, real hardcore stuff)...because they go in and out of the car and he scratches the discs occasionally and I just want another copy. It infuriates me that I can't legally copy them.

    I've even tried to find ways to break the protection just to copy a damn cartoon and can't really find a way. I used to have a Linux program that could do a decent job but I lost it in a HDD crash.

  12. #12
    Ridill
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    Copying DVDs is easy though..

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exoduso
    Copying DVDs is easy though..
    Well I can't seem to get around the copy protection, and I was trying to keep things digital->digital. I could play it and video capture sure, just like when I've put VHS on DVDs

    edit: I've even tried Linux programs that are supposed to do bit-copy and ignore protection, but they stop at a "blank" track 1 or 0 and error out

  14. #14
    Black Belt
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    ofn by like 2 days.

  15. #15
    Sea Torques
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zigma
    ofn by like 2 days.
    Yeah, but I didn't have to work yesterday...and I only cruise news sites while I'm at work

    Besides, we're having a lively discussion in here.

  16. #16
    Sea Torques
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    I didn't like get shorty THAT much. But it was amusing.

  17. #17

    Quote Originally Posted by Raineer
    Quote Originally Posted by Exoduso
    Copying DVDs is easy though..
    Well I can't seem to get around the copy protection, and I was trying to keep things digital->digital. I could play it and video capture sure, just like when I've put VHS on DVDs

    edit: I've even tried Linux programs that are supposed to do bit-copy and ignore protection, but they stop at a "blank" track 1 or 0 and error out
    It is just part of how CSS works..

    The important information can't be written to the blank DVD because that part is already burned as all 0s when you buy it. You have to run DeCSS against it before you can burn it.

    Another great part about DRM is how if you buy a DVD in America you can't play it while visiting Australia because they are all region encoded. Region 1 DVDs only play in region 1 players... It is so they can charge wildly different prices to different markets and not have to worry about things like "free market" taking over and people buying DVDs in India for $4 and selling them in England for $20.

    Just remember, none of it is about piracy and all of it is about maintaining their monopoly on distribution channels.

  18. #18
    St. Fiat
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    I wonder when they're going to figure out that if they want to do away with piracy they have to remove the incentive rather than try to screw over the legitimate end-user with DRM. Ie, offer a good product at a reasonable price. As a consumer, I don't much like the idea of paying $30-50 for a DVD that may or may not play in my home player or my DVD-ROM drive depending on how tight the exec's wads are feeling after that 7th beachfront home in Dubai. If I could get a new release with nifty extras that was well published (and if the industry cranked out a good:bad ratio better than 1:10) for something starting at $10-15 with no DRM and the gaurentee that it would work with my hardware, I'd buy it every single time and they'd save billions in R&D and implimentation of protection schemes that get broken in a month or less.

  19. #19
    Black Belt
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    People will still download it because it's free vs $10.00

  20. #20
    Hayleystrator
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    My DVD quality movies are more than enough for me... 19.5GB for a single file is... .

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